Scottie Collectibles | Trade Cards

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If you love Scotties, then most likely you love to collect anything Scottie! I recently came across trade cards featuring Scotties on ebay and wanted to share a few with you.  

If interested in the history of trade cards used in advertising, visit Cornell University Trade Cards: An Illustrated History – Home (cornell.edu) for a delightful illustrated history. Although very educational, none of the illustrations feature Scotties, so my hunt for more information continued. 

DOGS & FRIEND trade card printed by Carreras LTD established 1788 Arcadia Works London England. This tiny card is No. 5 of a series of 50 and is described on the back by Lady Kitty Ritson.

Scottish Terrier Trade Card Text on Back, Scottie and Little Girl on Back | Laurel Wreathe | Scottish Terrier Blog

It measures only ¼” wide by 2.5” long.At the bottom of the card it states, “KEEP THIS ATTRACTIVE SERIES OF CARDS IN THE CARRERAS SLIP IN ALBUM OBTAINABLE FROM ALL TOBACCONISTS (PRICE ONE PENNY).”

I wonder if those albums still exist.

This black and white card is referred to as “Scottie with Young Child” printed 1930’s by The House of Carreras, a tobacco company established in London in the nineteenth century by a nobleman from Spain, Don Jose’ Carreras Ferrer.

DOGS a series of 50 issued by John Player & Sons in the 1920’s. This card #45 features two Scotties on the front and a description on back. It refers to Scottish Terriers, as the Aberdeen Terrier hailing from the Highlands making the ideal house-dog

Player & Sons was a branch of Imperial Tobacco Company of Great Britain & Ireland founded in 1877 and located in Nottingham, England.

Scottish Terrier Trade Card Text on Back, Scottie Dog on Back | Laurel Wreathe | Scottish Terrier Blog

Per Wikipedia Trade card – Wikipedia, “The term, trade card, refers to a varied group of items made of paper or of card of varying sizes and shapes. Trade cards evolved in different ways in Britain, America and Europe, giving rise to wide variation in their format and design. The characteristic features of a trade card are that it is a small printed item, used by merchants and traders to give to their customers for their use as an aid to memory. Trade cards were sufficiently small so that they could be carried in the gentleman’s pocket or lady’s purse.”